Category Archives: Green and White Tea

Camellia sinensis leaves unoxidized.

Reviewing Our Reviews of Boston Tea Co. Teas

We had the honor, my humans and I, a few years back to try a number of teas from the Boston Tea Company and thought that a review was in order. TOOOT! Continue reading Reviewing Our Reviews of Boston Tea Co. Teas

Explore the Teas of Australia with Our Guide!

You know that a lot of tea comes from China, and a bunch come from India. Japanese teas are becoming better known (see Our Guide to Japanese Tea), as are teas from Taiwan and Africa (see 13 Tea-growing Countries in Africa). Don’t forget Brazil in South America (see Tea in South America and an Argentinean Group Tours Tea in India). And then, there’s Australia! Yes, the land of kangaroos and koala bears also is the land of tea. Continue reading Explore the Teas of Australia with Our Guide!

The Guide to Green and Yellow Teas of China Is Here!

Guide to Green & Yellow Teas of China is here!

Green and yellow teas are very similar, so we grouped them into one guide. The variety is somewhat overwhelming, so we focused on the main ones as well as a few special fairly rare ones. Yellow teas all seem to be rare, so we included them all. Happy reading, humans. TOOOT!

Details here

See also: Why Many Tea Drinkers Hate Green Tea (but shouldn’t)

© 2017-2021 World Is a Tea Party photos and text

YOUR SPONSORED AD COULD BE HERE OR YOUR SPONSORED LINKS COULD BE APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE. See here for more info.

Guest writers are welcome – just send us a private message in Facebook or Twitter.

Hi, humans, this site is under my editorial excellence. I, your lovable and sassy Little Yellow Teapot, authors articles on tea, etc., and edit the occasional guest article. All in the interest of helping you humans have a better tea experience. TOOOT!

Recipe for Tea Eggs Benedict by Janet Sanchez

A favorite dish at many restaurants serving breakfast and brunch is Eggs Benedict. Delightful, rich, and satisfying, yet thought by many to be too much of a challenge to prepare at home. Take heart! This recipe is easy. And it includes tea! Continue reading Recipe for Tea Eggs Benedict by Janet Sanchez

Flavors Compared: Chinese Green Tea vs. from Japanese Green Tea

When it comes to green tea, the two big contenders are China and Japan. And the flavor profiles couldn’t be more different. Or are they? Your fave little teapot and my humans dive into a few ways that they are. Your impressions are also welcome. Continue reading Flavors Compared: Chinese Green Tea vs. from Japanese Green Tea

Trying Some Japanese Teas with Keiko Suzuki

We saw this posted on the Facebook page of Keiko Suzuki, a dear lady who is starting her exploration into tea, and wanted to share it here as well as on our Facebook group.

The photo:

Her remarks:

I joined the workshop to study new sencha tea cultivars, “Shizukaori” and “Kirari31”.
I learned the background of cultivar, hybrid parent and more.
I review teas of the workshop.
From right, Yabukita, Saemidori, Kirari31 and Okuhikari.
Yabukita is the standard cultivar of Japanese sencha tea.
Saemidori is the cultivar parent of Kirari.
Okuhikari is the cultivar parent of Shizukaori.
I learned these characters

Learn more here:

© 2017-2021 World Is a Tea Party photos and text

YOUR SPONSORED AD COULD BE HERE OR YOUR SPONSORED LINKS COULD BE APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE. See here for more info.

Guest writers are welcome – just send us a private message in Facebook or Twitter.

Hi, humans, this site is under my editorial excellence. I, your lovable and sassy Little Yellow Teapot, authors articles on tea, etc., and edit the occasional guest article. All in the interest of helping you humans have a better tea experience. TOOOT!

Tea and the Cherry Blossom Festival

There are cherry trees in Washington, DC, and one of my humans was lucky enough years ago to have been there when cherry blossoms were in bloom. Now, she toasts them from afar with a nice cuppa tea!

About the D.C. Cherry Blossom Festival

The cherry trees growing in Washington, D.C., date back to 1912. They were a gift to the United States from Japan, a symbol of friendship. The presenter of this gift was the Mayor of Tokyo, Yukio Ozaki, with wishes for continued close relations between us. These trees are actually the second batch that was sent. The first batch of 2,000 was shipped in 1910 but arrived diseased. A new batch of 3,000 trees was sent and arrived in 1912. President William Howard Taft’s wife, First Lady Helen Herron Taft joined with Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador, in planting the first two trees on the north bank of the Tidal Basin in West Potomac Park (the area is ringed now with these beautiful trees).

The Cherry Blossom Festival has grown over the years, as such things do, starting in 1927 when school children held a re-enactment of that first tree planting. In 1935, civic groups added activities. In 1994, two weeks were added, making it a total of 16 days long, to cover more of the blooming period of the trees. In 2012, the festival was again lengthened, this time to a total of 5 weeks (35 days – so almost double), to hold a grand tribute on the 100th anniversary of the planting of those first trees. And it is now the greatest Springtime celebration in the U.S. with over 1.5 million visitors each year enjoying the gorgeous site of those blooms, especially when seen reflected in the waters of the Tidal Basin.

The Perfect Tea for “Blossom Gazing”

What could be more appropriate than Sencha Kyoto Cherry Rose Festival Green Tea. There isn’t actually such a festival (blossom gazing). But Kyoto has various other festivals, including Aoi Matsuri (“Hollyhock Festival”), Gion Matsuri (“Gion Festival”) named after the Gion district of the city, Bon Festival (a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one’s ancestors), and  Jidai Matsuri (“Festival of the Ages”) to celebrates Kyoto’s past.

This tea gives you that sense of something a-bloom, of Spring approaching. The base tea is a high quality green tea (usually Japanese sencha). It’s flavored with natural cherry flavoring and rose petals that combine in a wonderfully exotic manner. Having been at the festival in DC, my she human says that a sip of this tea is almost like being there. Just be sure to steep in water heated only to 160°F and only for about 2 minutes. Too hot of water and too long of steep will draw out some of the bitter elements from the tea leaves.

ets-jskc-b003If you’re visiting that Cherry Blossom Festival this year, carry along your travel mug filled with this tea and combine tea enjoyment with the beauty of nature. For those of us enjoying from afar, a toast of the teacups will suffice. *CLINK!*

© 2017-2021 World Is a Tea Party photos and text

YOUR SPONSORED AD COULD BE HERE OR YOUR SPONSORED LINKS COULD BE APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE. See here for more info.

Guest writers are welcome – just send us a private message in Facebook or Twitter.

tea_blog_lyt-solo005bHi, humans, this site is under my editorial excellence. I, your lovable and sassy Little Yellow Teapot, authors articles on tea, etc., and edit the occasional guest article. All in the interest of helping you humans have a better tea experience. TOOOT!

Hubei Province – Birthplace of Some Great Teas!

A lot of attention is paid to the teas from the Yunnan Province in our house, since many of them are made into pu-erhs (a tea style we especially like). And the Wuyi Mountains are known for some of the finest oolongs available. Keemun tea, from Qimen, Anhui, China, has captured the hearts of black tea lovers around the world. But the Hubei Province (湖北) deserves its share of the ballyhooing, as well. Some fine teas come from there, including their own version of Keemun. Your buddy little teapot (me!) presents four teas that are especially worthy of mention and a bit hard to come by. Continue reading Hubei Province – Birthplace of Some Great Teas!