Category Archives: Black Tea

Camellia sinensis leaves fully oxidized.

Recipes for Sweet Recipe for Sweet TEAcicles by Janet Sanchez

Summer is on a roll, and even though kids are heading back to school, Summer has more than a month left, according to the calendar. So plenty of time to enjoy this delicious and healthy cooling treat! Continue reading Recipes for Sweet Recipe for Sweet TEAcicles by Janet Sanchez

Rajiv Lochan, Doke Tea Garden Messenger

Being the messenger of Doke has become the purpose of my life now. Resettlement of those aboriginals who had the allotment of these lands where the new tea is flushing under the government declaration of non-traditional tea growing area in 1999 June is an important corporate social responsibility. Growing and manufacturing tea with the new found water in this parched area of Bihar is a boon and establishment of a new university and an agricultural college in the vicinity of Doke is a great opportunity to establish tea tourism facilities there to integrate on this twenty-year-old project.

Click on photos for details:

Neha’s presence there gives an edge over these activities, being a young lady entrepreneur whom the present government is encouraging very much. Vivek’s marketing and my international support thru the G3 tea diplomacy movement and the encouraging responses in Japan through Chitose San where the almost similar wako 茶 has given the instant acceptability as duck tea.

My recent trip to America, which was mainly to propagate tea diplomacy and make tea in different places next being Hawaii, and my interactions with different tea growers and tea scholars of different universities and our earlier China trip for the integration of their advanced tea research inputs made me so excited about the future of Tea in America – both North and South. Destiny has been bringing in many tea travelers from these lands to us and we see a very bright future for Doke.

At Vegas I spoke on Tea diplomacy, and in New York I spoke to Indian tea board chairman who will initiate the process of world Tea Festival to be held in Darjeeling in Feb 2018 on tea diplomacy lines.

Now, I am preparing for Sept 2017 international tea forum to be held in Enshi in China to take the cause of Tea diplomacy with Professor Wang Xufeng.

As the Doke Tea Garden Messenger, I am very busy indeed!

Regards,
Rajiv Lochan 老罗
Lochan Tea Limited
www.rajivlochan.com

© 2017-2021 World Is a Tea Party photos and text

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Guest writers are welcome – just send us a private message in Facebook or Twitter.

Hi, humans, this site is under my editorial excellence. I, your lovable and sassy Little Yellow Teapot, authors articles on tea, etc., and edit the occasional guest article. All in the interest of helping you humans have a better tea experience. TOOOT!

Exploring the Nahorhabi Assam Tea Garden – A Little Yellow Teapot Report

Having had the recent pleasure of helping my humans try a sample of tea from the Nahorhabi tea garden, and having found it quite satisfactory, I also wanted to take a bit of a virtual tour of the garden to see what could be seen. Come along with me, dear tea loving humans. TOOOT! Continue reading Exploring the Nahorhabi Assam Tea Garden – A Little Yellow Teapot Report

Reviewing Our Reviews of Boston Tea Co. Teas

We had the honor, my humans and I, a few years back to try a number of teas from the Boston Tea Company and thought that a review was in order. TOOOT! Continue reading Reviewing Our Reviews of Boston Tea Co. Teas

Explore the Teas of Australia with Our Guide!

You know that a lot of tea comes from China, and a bunch come from India. Japanese teas are becoming better known (see Our Guide to Japanese Tea), as are teas from Taiwan and Africa (see 13 Tea-growing Countries in Africa). Don’t forget Brazil in South America (see Tea in South America and an Argentinean Group Tours Tea in India). And then, there’s Australia! Yes, the land of kangaroos and koala bears also is the land of tea. Continue reading Explore the Teas of Australia with Our Guide!

Typhoo Tea – The Doctor Is In

Tea has many well-documented health benefits. One tea company even declares this in the name of its tea — “Typhoo,” from a Chinese word meaning “doctor.” It’s a tea that’s been around since the early 1900s and is still enjoyed daily by millions.

Modern medicine has only been around a relatively short time in man’s history. Many of the products in pharmacies and drug stores didn’t exist back in the early 1900s. So, what did people do when they had an upset stomach? Mary Augusta Sumner, sister of John Sumner who ran the family grocery business after his father retired, had indigestion problems. There was no pink liquid in a bottle, no pills to take a half hour before you eat, or ones to take right after. She tried a tea made from tiny leaf pieces, an alternative to teas brewed from full-leaf and broken-leaf teas popular at that time, and found it aided her digestion. Her brother started producing this tea for his store, packaging and naming it (“Typhoo Tipps Tea,” now simply “Typhoo Tea”) so his customers would know this tea was more than just great-tasting.

Typhoo Tea, Ltd., was incorporated in 1905 after Sumner had sold off his grocery business to pay some debts. This proved to be one of the better decisions for tea drinkers worldwide. The company made a profit in its first year, something that many businesses cannot boast. Sumner further reduced production costs, and passed his savings on to the customers through lower prices, by instituting changes in his business operations. He cut out some of the middlemen by dealing directly with a buying/blending agency in Ceylon that bought the teas that went into Typhoo directly at tea auctions and then started having those teas blended in Ceylon.

The company survived two World Wars. During the first one, they overcame government restrictions that would have doomed them, and retained the loyalty of their customers. During the second one, their factory was bombed, the government confiscated their tea supply, and they had to farm out production of their tea to other companies for awhile. In between the wars, Sumner had to deal with a quality control problem when he discovered that the agents in Ceylon were buying inferior quality tea but charging the same price for a higher profit. Eventually, tea blending operations were moved to England so they could keep a better eye on things.

Typhoo Tea, Ltd., carried on through the years, continuing to blend the finest teas, using only the leaf edges to get more cups of tea to the pound and avoid the stems which include tannin that can cause indigestion. Company ownership changed in the 1960s, again in the late 1980s, and once more in the late 1990s. In 2005 Typhoo and its associated brands were acquired by one of India’s largest tea producers, Apeejay Surrendra Group. Along the way, they continued to produce their wonderful, gentle-on-the-tummy tea but added some items to their product line: Typhoo One Cup, Typhoo Q Tea instant, the first green tea blend introduced to the UK market, and Typhoo Fruit and Herb.

Today, not only are Typhoo and similar teas very popular in England, but 95% of the tea Brits drink is bagged. Interesting to know, considering the increasing promotion of finer, full-leaf teas. Typhoo Tea’s Executives and Blenders are mostly like me — they like their tea strong with milk and sweetener. Smart people!

Time to steep up a potful and enjoy a cup or two with my hubby. Enjoy!

Visit Typhoo International’s website

Disclaimer: We get no remuneration for supplying this link. It is for your convenience only.

© 2017-2021 World Is a Tea Party photos and text

YOUR SPONSORED AD COULD BE HERE OR YOUR SPONSORED LINKS COULD BE APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE. See here for more info.

Guest writers are welcome – just send us a private message in Facebook or Twitter.

Hi, humans, this site is under my editorial excellence. I, your lovable and sassy Little Yellow Teapot, authors articles on tea, etc., and edit the occasional guest article. All in the interest of helping you humans have a better tea experience. TOOOT!

Hubei Province – Birthplace of Some Great Teas!

A lot of attention is paid to the teas from the Yunnan Province in our house, since many of them are made into pu-erhs (a tea style we especially like). And the Wuyi Mountains are known for some of the finest oolongs available. Keemun tea, from Qimen, Anhui, China, has captured the hearts of black tea lovers around the world. But the Hubei Province (湖北) deserves its share of the ballyhooing, as well. Some fine teas come from there, including their own version of Keemun. Your buddy little teapot (me!) presents four teas that are especially worthy of mention and a bit hard to come by. Continue reading Hubei Province – Birthplace of Some Great Teas!

Darjeeling Tea Tourism Is a Growing Trend

India is seeing the interest in tea tourism really growing and becoming an important source of revenue for some struggling tea gardens. The Darjeeling area is a big draw and sports many fine locations from which to choose. This little teapot encourages you humans to check them out. We offer some information on a few that we find especially inviting below. Continue reading Darjeeling Tea Tourism Is a Growing Trend